Posts Tagged ‘labor law’

Equal Pay Day- women working hard(er) for the money

Today, April 12 , is Equal Pay Day in the United States. Strategically chosen, the date marks how long it takes women to make up for the disparity in pay between genders. Just think, 102 days passed this year before women finally earned the same salary as men in comparable jobs during the past year.
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19 Wisconsin counties flip on Gov. Walker—but outcome of Supreme Court race still unclear

Weeks of protests across Wisconsin let unionbusting legislators know that workers won’t stand for ideologically motivated attacks on their rights. And this week’s Supreme Court race took that message from Madison to the polls. Read more »

 

The Right To Join A Union: From Eleanor Roosevelt to John Kasich

Guest Post by Author and Labor Scholar Brigid O’Farrell.

When my phone rang in Moss Beach, California, I was surprised to find a young girl calling from a small town in Ohio, not far from Columbus. She and her friends in eighth grade were writing a play about Eleanor Roosevelt for a school project. She saw my book on the internet, She Was One of Us: Eleanor Roosevelt and the American Worker. They wanted their drama to address the workers in Ohio and Wisconsin. “Eleanor Roosevelt went into a coal mine, didn’t she?” the girl asked. “Do you think she would be supporting the workers today?” Read more »

 

Entertainers and sports stars sound off in support of public employees

Earlier this week, we described how entertainers and sports stars – most union members themselves – have taken to Twitter, the blogosphere, and other mediums to express solidarity with workers in Wisconsin and states across the country who are fighting to protect their basic rights.

While it’s great to see the outpouring of celebrity support, the sheer volume of messages can make tracking difficult. So we’ve assembled a roundup of their tweets, posts, and statements to make their messages easier for workers’ rights supporters to access.

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Update: Facebook’s role in the modern workplace

In October, we told you about the story of  Dawnmarie Souza,  an emergency medical technician fired for complaints about work that she wrote on Facebook. At the time, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed a complaint against Dawnmarie’s employer, American Medical Response of Connecticut, asserting that it interfered with protected activity.

On Monday, American Medical settled with the NLRB shortly before an admistrative law judge was to hear the case. The company agreed to correct its admittedly “overly broad” rules to ensure that workers’ right to concerted activity was protected – on and offline. Read more »

 

Coming soon: Made in Dagenham

Made in Dagenham posterChristmas came early (or in my case, Hanukkah came late) to the American Rights at Work staff this week. We got invited to a preview screening of “Made in Dagenham“, starring Sally Hawkins, Bob Hoskins and Richard Schiff.

“Made in Dagenham” is a dramatization of the 1968 Ford sewing machinists strike at the Ford Dagenham assembly plant in England, where women were classified as “unskilled” workers and paid considerably less than their male co-workers. They eventually brought Ford’s assembly line to a halt, walking out in protest against sexual discrimination and the unequal pay. Their actions were instrumental in England’s Equal Pay Act of 1970. Read more »

 

Facebook: the new watercooler?

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) broke new ground this week, filing a complaint against American Medical Response of Connecticut for firing an emergency medical technician who posted a criticism of her boss on her Facebook profile.

The NLRB’s decision comes at a time when employers are increasing their use of social networking websites to keep an eye on their workers—and prospective employees.

The company in question, an ambulance service provider, accused Dawnmarie Souza of violating a policy that prohibits workers from portraying the company “in any way” on social media websites like Facebook. Then they fired her. Read more »

 

Long-overdue updates come to the NLRB

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has held the authority to enforce the National Labor Relations Act since 1935, and little has changed since that time. Unscrupulous employers were breaking the law then, and they’re still union busting today. But we’ve seen the Board’s ability to effectively enforce the Act weaken as the nature of work changed and employer tactics became more sophisticated.

Fortunately, in a pair of decisions made public yesterday, the NLRB issued long-needed updates to two remedial mechanisms—electronic notice posting of unfair labor practices and compound daily interest on back pay. Both remedies are routinely used in cases where the NLRB finds that a party violated the National Labor Relations Act.

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Xerox: Do you copy?

Last week, Forbes named Xerox CEO Ursula Burns one of the most powerful women in the world. But what the magazine failed to mention is that her company is doing everything it can to keep unions out of the workplace.

In addition to making photocopiers, Xerox also runs the call centers for E-ZPass, the automatic tollbooth system in New York state. And when E-ZPass workers in Staten Island, NY voted to join the Communications Workers of America, Xerox retaliated by telling 19 employees that they had to transfer or leave the company. Read more »

 

The Stubborn Facts on the Economic Impact of Right-to-Work Laws

Michael Wasser is American Rights at Work’s summer 2010 research intern.

Proponents of so-called “right-to-work laws,” such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Right to Work Committee, argue that they create a more business-friendly environment and lead to economic growth for states and their residents.

But is that really the case?

As Jack Hough noted in a recent Smart Money article, new research suggests that the supposed economic benefits of right-to-work laws may be little more than useful rhetoric for the law’s supporters. Read more »